How To Fall Asleep In 60 Seconds?

People who suffer from sleeping disorders, like insomnia, have experienced all its numerous harmful effects. If you belong to this group of people, this article will probably change your life!

Namely, Dr. Andrew Weil has discovered an extremely simple way to help you fall asleep in seconds! Continue reading

The Negative Side-Effects of Meditation

by Alberto Perez-De-Albeniz and Jeremy Holmes

International Journal of Psychotherapy, Mar2000, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p49, 10p

Abstract: This article reviews 75 scientific selected articles in the field of meditation, including Transcendental Meditation among others. It summarizes definitions of meditation, psychological and physiological changes, and negative side-effects encountered by 62.9% of meditators studied. While the authors did not restrict their study to TM, the side-effects reported were similar to those found in the “German Study” of Transcendental Meditators: relaxation-induced anxiety and panic; paradoxical increases in tension; less motivation in life; boredom; pain; impaired reality testing; confusion and disorientation; feeling ‘spaced out’; depression; increased negativity; being more judgmental; feeling addicted to meditation; uncomfortable kinaesthetic sensations; mild dissociation; feelings of guilt; psychosis-like symptoms; grandiosity; elation; destructive behavior; suicidal feelings; defenselessness; fear; anger; apprehension; and despair. Continue reading

What Is The Aura?

What is the Aura ?


Everything in the Universe seems to be just a vibration. Every atom, every part of an atom, every electron, every elementary “particle”, even our thoughts and consciousness are just vibrations. Hence, we may define the Aura as a electro-photonic vibration response of an object to some external excitation (such as an ambient light for example). This definition is sufficient for the purpose of reading Auras, providing that we can train ourselves to see the Aura vibration. Continue reading

Who Are The Tarahumara People?

by https://www.themonastery.org

The Tarahumara is a tribe of indigenous people of the northern regions of Mexico. Although they were originally from what is now the state of Chihuahua, the Tarahumara, also called the Raramuri, now inhabit the Copper Canyon in the Sierra Madre mountain range where they have lived since the coming of the Spaniards in the 16th century.

The Tarahumara tribe is best known to the western world for their athletic ability in long-distance running. The population of 50,000 to 70,000 Tarahumara that exist today remain largely a traditional people, living exactly as their ancestors did hundreds of years ago. Although separate villages are some distance apart, they maintain contact with the only means of transportation they have ever used – running. From an early age, the Tarahumara train their children in the art of long-distance running for both practical reasons and to keep tribal tradition alive. Continue reading

Simply Red: Why One Colour Became So Powerful

Who gets to walk on the red carpet? What makes red-letter days so special? Where is the red line that must not be crossed? When do we go to red alert? Why do you see red? And how can one colour have such diverse meanings in our lives?

These questions are not answered by Newton’s famous experiments with prisms, which led to the colour red being defined as the long end of the visible spectrum. The wavelength of light is a very abstract idea and completely irrelevant to our everyday experience of colour. It does nothing, for example, to explain why contestants in red sports kits are statistically more likely to win than those in other colours.

Red is simply sensational and its dominant place in today’s world of colour owes much to events that took place many thousands of years ago. One of humankind’s earliest observable activities was their decorative use of colour – in fact, it is one of the things that makes us human. And we can track down red’s hold over us by tracing the way artists got their colour over time – from animals, vegetables and minerals. Continue reading

Seven Principles of Samurai

The Seven Principles of Bushido
Bushidō (武士道) or the “Way of the Warrior” describes a uniquely Japanese code of ethical conduct adhered to by the samurai. It is loosely analogous to Western concepts of chivalry (think Knights of the Round Table) and yet it is more. Bushido encompasses a system of moral principles. It embodies a code of daily living for the samurai. Those instructed in the code are expected to discipline themselves according to it. There are seven principles of Bushido:

 
 1. Rectitude. Correct judgment or procedure for the resolution of righteousness. “To die when it is right to die, to strike when it is right to strike.”
2. Courage. A virtue only in the cause of righteousness. Death for an unworthy cause was termed a dog”s death. “It is true courage to live when it is right to live, and to die only when it is right to die.”
3. Benevolence. Love, affection for others, sympathy and nobility of feeling are regarded as the highest attributes of the soul. “Benevolence brings under its sway whatever hinder its power just as water subdues fire.”
4. Politeness. A poor virtue if it is actuated only by a fear of offending good taste. Rather it should stem from a sympathetic regard for the feeling of others. “In its highest form politeness approaches love.”
5. Veracity. “Truthfulness.” Lying was deemed cowardly, and it was regarded as dishonorable. Indeed the word of a samurai guaranteed the truthfulness of an assertion. No oath is necessary. “Propriety carried beyond bounds becomes a lie.”
6. Honor. A vivid consciousness of personal dignity and worth is implicit in the word honor. “Dishonor is like a scar on a tree which time, instead of effacing only helps to enlarge.”
7. Loyalty. Only in the code of chivalrous honor does loyalty assume importance. In the conflict between loyalty and affection the code never wavers from the choice of loyalty. “A samurai was obliged to appeal to the intelligence and conscience of his sovereign by demonstrating the sincerity of his words with the shedding of his own blood.”
Source: http://www.mainlinebudo.com

Harvard Study Reveals What Meditation Does To Our Brains

By Sue McGreevey, MGH Communications

Participating in an eight-week mindfulness meditation program appears to make measurable changes in brain regions associated with memory, sense of self, empathy, and stress. In a study that will appear in the Jan. 30 issue of Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, a team led by Harvard-affiliated researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) reported the results of their study, the first to document meditation-produced changes over time in the brain’s gray matter. Continue reading